What does a decades-closed landfill have in common with local foods and fresh fish, algae and biodiesel? They’re all closely linked together in a new energy-creation and economic cycle: one that offsets harmful greenhouse gases while bettering the environment and benefiting the community.

What does a decades-closed landfill have in common with local foods and fresh fish, algae and biodiesel? They’re all closely linked together in a new energy-creation and economic cycle: one that offsets harmful greenhouse gases while bettering the environment and benefiting the community. Brattleboro, VT, and Carbon Harvest Energy are working to prove that renewable energy and sustainable agriculture are good not only for the earth, but also for the bottom line.

Carbon Harvest Energy, a two-year-old company based in Burlington, created the Brattleboro Renewable Energy and Sustainable Agriculture Project. The project is designed to revive an offline landfill, which decades ago generated methane gas for energy. In addition, it is hoped that the project will become the first link in a chain that uses and reuses power — and virtually every waste product generated — for good. When complete, it will be the first integrated, renewable energy-to-agriculture, algae feed and biodiesel project in the country: Burning the methane for power will offset roughly the equivalent of 20,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year, and a portion of leftover CO2 will be harvested for algae production.

Learn more about the project at willraap.org